Missouri Environmental Education News: September 2022

Welcome to the lastest edition of MEEA's Newsletter
Lesli Moylan Photo

Table of Contents

  • Feature Article
  • Lesson Resources
  • Save the Date: Annual Conference
  • Vista Positions Available
  • Featured Events, Grants, & Workshops
  • JEDIA: Justice, Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Accessibility
  • Green Schools Corner
  • Missouri Nature Phenomena This Month
  • News from the Field
Dear MEEA Friends and Members,

Wow, thank you to everyone who has renewed their membership in the last month!  Please welcome Organizational Members: City of Springfield Environmental Services Department, Fat Daddy’s Farm Foundation, Missouri Department of Conservation, Missouri Prairie Foundation, Missouri River Bird Observatory, St. Louis Zoo, U.S. Green Building Council – Missouri Gateway Chapter, Washington University Tyson Research Center, and the Watershed Committee of the Ozarks.

The support that Membership provides for MEEA is quite tangible:

1. It helps cover compensation for our new staff member, Jamin Bray.  Jamin is already increasing our reach across the state and especially into rural Missouri, a goal dear to her heart.  She’s been making connections, sharing resources, and providing support to several rural schools already…not to mention creating this newsletter every month!

2. Simply put, the number of Official Members can help MEEA demonstrate to our funders the need for MEEA resources.

We know that a MEEA Membership will benefit our members in many ways as well.  Thinking about going to the conference?  Members get discounts!  Want to apply for a MEEA mini-grant?  Members can do that!  Want to be recognized for your EE work? Members are eligible for MEEA awards!  Want to earn EE Certification?  Members are eligible to go on that journey!  Our Board of Directors is currently engaged in strategic planning, and Member Services has already been identified as a top priority for 2023-2025. As a member, you have the opportunity to tell us how we can better serve you so we can tailor our goals to match your needs.

If you haven’t joined or renewed already, please help us today by clicking the button below, and help us bring environmental education the attention it deserves.

With sincere thanks,
Lesli Moylan, Executive Director

Become a Member

 

Feature Article: Adventures in the Woods

I am very proud of the fact that I raised two independent young men. They had enough confidence to leave their home state of Missouri and move to another part of the country. Both of my sons and their families live on the East Coast, one in Pennsylvania and one in Virginia.  Since my sons have married and have their own families, it has become very important for me to connect with their children since I don’t get to be with them frequently.

I have made memories with my grandchildren by having “Camp Nana” every summer. We gather in one location (PA or VA) and do crafts, bake cookies and have tea parties. This summer I wanted to do something a little different. I created a fantasy story and my grandchildren were the characters in my story. We went to a local park that had a Nature Trail. I was an Enchantress whose pet dragon was kidnapped by an evil wizard.  My granddaughters volunteered to be my warriors to help me get my dragon back. We walked along the Nature Trail and collected clues concerning the whereabouts of my kidnapped dragon.  While we walked the trail and collected clues, I identified birds by their songs and shared them with the kids. I showed them pictures of what the birds looked like when we couldn’t see them. We heard tree frogs, owls, cicadas, and the sound of a brook.  We watched minnows and little crawdads in the water, worms crawling on the bank, and tiny frogs hopping about.

We didn’t find my pet dragon that day (we had many other places to search for it!) but the day in the forest was the kids’ favorite place during the week of “Camp Nana.” Check out Nature Trails in your area. A simple walk is enough to get children looking for birds, trees and wildlife. But you could also make up a story to create more fun. Use your imagination! For nature trails, caves and hiking in Missouri and near where you live, visit the following websites:

See Missouri 

https://www.visitmo.com/thats-my-mo/outdoor-mo?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIu4iKzZve-QIVRjizAB3rvAqMEAAYASAAEgKlFfD_BwE

Missouri State Parks

https://www.visitmo.com/itineraries/10-missouri-state-parks-to-visit-this-fall?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7avHw57e-QIV9j6tBh1lmQitEAAYASAAEgLUbPD_BwE

And have FUN!!!

 

 

FEATURE ARTICLE and PHOTO SUBMITTED BY:

Joan Ruppert, RN, MSN, EdD

MEEA Board Member and retired as faculty from University of Missouri-St. Louis College of Nursing.

Lesson Resources: Fantasy, Stories and Dramatic Play Out in Nature

FEATURED LESSON IDEAS SUBMITTED BY:
Jamin Bray, MEEA Assistant Director
I can’t think of better lessons to compliment Joan Ruppert’s lovely article, Adventures in the Woods, than to introduce you to two over-the-top inspiring resources that can help all of us follow her advice.

If you’re not aware of the genious document/curriculum “Growing Up Wild,” I highly recommend it, especially if you want to share the outdoors and nature experiences with very young children such as Joan’s grandkids.  Every single lesson includes background facts relative to the lesson theme, vocabulary, and detailed preparation and prodecures. They all also include fantastic extension ideas, such as imaginative Take Me Outside and healthy activities, fine arts connections (such as drama, art, and music), community service ideas, crafts, and even snacks!

Growing Up WILD: Ages 3-7: Exploring Nature with Young Children, Council for Environmental Education (CEE), 4th Edition, 2011. ISBN 0615459250, 9780615459257

 

Adventures in Nature Resources

  • I’ve also included a US Forest Service site that has multiple links to great lesson sources, and one of the best videos I’ve seen about the need for children to connect with nature.  Be ready, it’s so well done and inspiring, it might just give you goosebumps! https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/learning/parents-teachers

Save the Date for the Annual MEEA Conference!

Optional Field Trips on Nov. 6, too!

We are encouraging Youth to attend and/or present at this event.  For more information on this special Youth Engagement opportunity, contact Lesli Moylan:  moylan@meea.org

**Register Now:

https://www.kacee.org/event-details/2022-conference

 

Vista Positions Available

Current Open VISTA Positions

Interested?

Click the links below to find out more!

 

  • Two School Support positions:  Provide one-on-one support for under-resourced Missouri schools, assist with action planning, progress tracking, and outreach to expand the program.  MGS School Support VISTA
  • One Partner Network Coordinator position:  Manage the development of a statewide network of organizations that desire to help schools lower their environmental impact, improve health, and shift to a culture of sustainability.  MGS Partner Network Coordinator VISTA
  • One Communications/Marketing position:  Raise awareness, participation and support of the Missouri Green Schools program throughout the state, and develop skills in website and social media management. (This position has been filled)

Featured…

Events

Featured Event:

Association of Missouri Interpreters Conference, Sept 20-22, St. Joseph, MO

AMI Conference

 

Grants

Featured Grant:

MEEA Environmental Educator Mini-Grants (eight available); Proposal due Sept 15.

MEEA Mini-grants

Workshops

Featured Workshops:

Teacher Workshops for MDC Discover Nature Schools

MDC Discover Nature Schools

JEDIA: Justice, Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Accessibility

The Acronym “JEDIA” is a mouthful and can be confusing.

This month let’s explore the I and the A!

If we want to understand JEDIA and how important it is in Environmental Education, we need to start at the beginning.

This first video is a brief explanation from NAAEE, and the second goes into more detail about experiencing inequity, and how a disconnect from nature can affect human health.  Take a look!

Green Schools Corner

Those of you who are teachers across the state have probably just set up your classrooms and started a new school year, with all kinds of hopes and dreams of successes inside the classroom.  Some may also be thinking about successes OUTSIDE the classrom, and are perhaps looking into the multitude of grant possibilities for green spaces coming your way this time of year (go to our “grants” link to find out more).

That’s wonderful, and we’re here to help whenever we can!  In the mean time, there are some things a teacher can do to make your school (or at least your classroom!) “Green.” Here are some tips we found from weareteachers.com (kudos to them for making “sustainability” a priority!). Our favorites are #27 (sustainability!), and #42 (Team up with organizations-hey-that could be us!!):

https://www.weareteachers.com/green-school-tips/

 

No matter what, the best tip we at MEEA can give is simply: get outside with your kids as much as possible, no matter what subject you teach! It will be good for them AND you!

Nature Phenomena This Month

Photo courtesy of Missouri Department of Conservation. Learn more at https://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide

News from the Field

Good News!!

By Charlotte Elton

Visiting green spaces can dramatically lower mental health drug use, research has found.

Dropping into a park, community garden or other urban green space between three and four times a week can cut people’s chances of taking medication for anxiety or depression by a third.

The positive impact - documented by researchers at the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare - also extends to physical health.

Visiting green spaces reduces the chances of a city resident having to take asthma or high blood pressure medication by a third and a quarter, respectively.

“Mounting scientific evidence supporting the health benefits of nature exposure is likely to increase the supply of high-quality green spaces in urban environments and promote their active use,” the researchers write.

“This might be one way to improve health and welfare in cities.”

 

To read related articles and more research on this topic:  euronews.com/green

 

Water Quality Improvement Funds

Deadline to respond is April 3

JEFFERSON CITY, MO,  JAN. 18, 2023 – The Missouri Department of Natural Resources has funding available for projects that will protect Missouri’s waters from pollution caused by stormwater runoff, also known as nonpoint source pollution. Responses to a new request for proposals for this federal grant funding are due April 3, 2023.

To be eligible for grant funding, an applicant must implement pollutant-reducing land management practices from a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency- and department-accepted watershed-based plan. Watersheds with active watershed-based plans include: Black Creek (Shelby County), Deer Creek (St. Louis County), Spring River, James River, Keifer Creek, Perry County Karst, Town Branch-Piper Creek, upper Little Sac River, and North and Middle Fabius rivers. Local governments, state agencies, educational institutions and 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply for the grant funding. Research, land purchase and NPDES permit requirements are not eligible.

Grant awards can range from $50,000 to $400,000 and projects can span up to three years. Authorized by Section 319 of the federal Clean Water Act, the grant funding is provided by EPA and administered by the department.

Nonpoint source pollution occurs when excess surface runoff from rainfall or snowmelt carries pollutants, such as chemicals, bacteria, sediment and debris, into nearby waters. Nonpoint source pollution is the greatest threat to water quality in Missouri and the nation. Controlling this type of pollution is particularly challenging. Because stormwater runoff travels across the landscape collecting pollutants, it is difficult to pinpoint and address the specific sources.

To respond to the request for proposals, visit dnr.mo.gov/water/what-were-doing/nonpoint-source-pollution-section-319/subgrants. For more information about the application process or about watershed-based plans, contact the department’s Section 319 Nonpoint Source Grant Program at 573-751-5723 or 800-361-4827, or by email at MoDNR.NPSprogram@dnr.mo.gov